Recap/Review – Major Crimes – “False Pretenses” – 6/17/13

majorcrimesrecap620smallThe squad investigates what looks to be a murder-suicide; Rusty receives an anonymous letter about the trial.

Recap:

The episode opens with close-ups of a gloved man writing a letter, with coffee and a gun lying nearby…for inspiration?

Speaking of coffee… Flynn is avoiding all toxins and drinking special juice, and as indicative of all those on a cleanse, he has to tell everyone about it. At the crime scene.

Jump with me to read more.

Two bodies were found by the maid, Claudia. She found her employers, a brother and sister, Janet and William, dead in their home. She says they argued about Janet’s husband earlier, but that he wouldn’t do something like this.

Queasy, Emma Rios freaks out when she notices that Janet’s face is gone, but Julio is quick to comfort her.

Provenza tries to appeal to whatever heart she has left and fails when he asks her to make a deal in the Stroh case in order to avoid bringing up horrible memories for Rusty, but she won’t budge.

Kendall puts time of death at 24-36 hours. Their second victim, William Edwards, a cosmetic dentist, has a gun in his hand, and it appears that he shot himself after murdering his sister.

Texts between the brother and sister reveal that she was being abused by her husband and seeking shelter with her brother.

Tao finds emails between Janet and her husband setting up a dinner date around the time of the possible murder-suicide.

Buzz notes that William’s Facebook photos don’t match with his crime scene video, and Dr. Morales brings more good news when he finds that Williams was restrained shortly before his death.

The good news keeps coming: Rusty’s received a letter from an “old friend.”

After the break, we find that the letter mentions Stroh’s case and Rusty’s past life. Ms. Rios suggests they toss Stroh’s cell, gather a handwriting sample from Rusty, and move him elsewhere. Guess which one of those Raydor disagrees with?

Janet’s husband Dwayne is in the precinct, and he’s speaking as if she’s still alive. He describes their dinner date: they argued, she left the restaurant, so he dropped her off at William’s house. He says he saw a strange car parked at William’s house, but thought it was just one of William’s lovers.

Claudia confirms Buzz’s concerns when she notifies the detectives that many things have been moved in William’s bedroom. The detectives also find what used to be William’s secret stash. It’s missing both the drugs and cash, according to Claudia.

While Flynn and Tao wait for the owner of the gun found in William’s hand to answer the door, Flynn gets a little cardio in. Stewart Ness is the registered owner and denies and then admits to owning the gun, but says that he lost it.

Emma tries to appeal to Taylor; now she wants to keep Rusty safe in her efforts to move him from Raydor’s home. A couple of minutes ago, she didn’t care about the “child prostitute.” Finicky, isn’t she. Raydor appeals to Taylor’s decreasing budget and has him delay, as Rusty’s protection will cost a great deal.

Raydor has designed a press release for Taylor to let the killer think he’s gotten away with it.

Back in the interrogation room, Stewart is blaming a robber for the theft of his gun. He didn’t say anything because he thinks it’s the guy he hooked up with, cheating on his boyfriend. He found the guy on DudeRanch, an app for meeting Ryan Gosling-like dudes. According to Stewart, hot unknown man messaged…er…whipped him first, and he responded.

Raydor doesn’t find the app on William’s phone, but Buzz finds it on his laptop.

Stewart says the man knocked him down, handcuffed him, and then packed up his gun. Fortunately, Stewart saved the photo of the shirtless thief.

And now, all Tao has to do is download the app and sign on as Mr. Clean. He whips shirtless-thief in a crowd, and they handcuff him. Funny, you think he’d like that more. Shirtless thief’s real name is Tyler Allen.

After the break, it’s Sharon & Rusty bonding time. Sharon suggests she drive him to school—and by suggests, she means she’s just giving notice about what WILL happen.

Allen has chosen a public defender, and they’ve found prescriptions in the names of the people he’s robbed. Raydor urges Rios to stray away from the double homicide, and she agrees. Barely.

The trio meet with Allen’s attorney and label his robberies as a possible hate crime. They agree to four years if he gives up ALL of his robberies.

Allen isn’t a robber. He’s a hard up musician. And he swears that these weren’t hate crimes; he’s an equal opportunity thief, but the gays were easy targets. Nice. He talks about this one guy in particular, in a big house with a bunch of watches. He only used the handcuffs to be safe. He only took drugs, watches, and cash; it was only his way to live. He signs the deal, and Rios, thankfully, leaves. Raydor brings out the big gun, the one he stole from Stewart. The lawyer is all flustered, and so is Tyler, who is rambling on about how he had to do it! He says he panicked, but he forgot that he made it look like a murder-suicide. Whoops!

Now that the other case is solved, they traced the prints on Rusty’s letter to the post office employees, Raydor, and Buzz. Raydor won’t be sending Rusty away, but he won’t be able to leave the sight of an officer at any time. He’s essentially grounded…until the trial. He doesn’t mind so much, as long as he gets to stay with Sharon.
 
Review:

I thought the creepy letter writing had something to do with the murder of the week (until mid-episode, of course) Poor Rusty finds happiness for two minutes, and now someone’s after him.

Loved, loved this episode, even with the pesky Rios in it. It’s only the second episode of the season, and the detectives are quirkier than ever! Flynn with his annoying, but cute cleanse, Tao’s immediate take to DudeRanch, and Julio’s obsession with my least favorite character. Who says episodes featuring double homicides can’t be hilarious?

– Lindsay

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